Social Studies Courses

The different subject area strands in social studies combine to give a clear picture of the past and present. Strands also give depth to the social studies curriculum, enabling students to grasp the complexity of events from the past and help them acquire critical thinking skills to make informed choices in the future. The 2004 Mississippi Social Studies Framework and Guide are comprised of four (4) essential strands: HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, CIVICS, and ECONOMICS. The strands overlap and combine in the competencies, showing the integrated and complex nature of the social studies.
 
Social Studies
COURSE SEQUENCE
Grade 9 Mississippi Studies and World Geography
Grade 10 World History from the Age of Enlightenment to the Present
Grade 11 United States History: 1877 to the Present
Grade 12 United States Government and Economics

 

 World History
Description:
This course is to make available to high school students, a survey of world history that will help them understand their own times. The complicated problems facing the world today cannot be understood without a working knowledge of what has gone on before. This course attempts to present history so that students can see the world in all its interrelationships, rather than as isolated nations and civilizations. It tries to show the continuity of history, the influence of each era upon succeeding times, and the sweeping forces of historical cause and effect. Great attention is given to political developments, geographical influence, and the growth of ideas, religions, education, and art, as well as other civilizing geographical influence, and the growth of ideas, religions, education, and art, as well as other civilizing forces. Above all else, however, this course seeks to develop in the students an appreciation of the differences of people and cultures, and respect for the origins and worth of all people, past and present.
Credit Unit:
1
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
2 semesters 
 
Geography
Description:
The Introduction to World Geography course is designed to provide students with basic geography skill in order that they may analyze, interpret, and explain the components of our world. Students will master the use of the five themes of geography by using the themes to examine Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, and Oceania, Europe, Middle America, North America, and South America. Exercises include the interpretation and application of maps, graphs, charts, political cartoons, primary documents, and other social studies tools.
Credit Unit:
1/2
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
1 semester 
 
AP European History
Description:
Knowledge of the way people have lived and of the way events and ideas have shaped our lives helps us understand the world of the present. As we grapple with such questions in this course, the hope is that the student will emerge with: (1) an enjoyment of -or at least satisfaction from-the learning process itself; (2) a broad knowledge of the history of Europe sufficient enough to feel prepared to take the Advanced Placement exam; (3) an appreciation of some of the political, economic, social, and intellectual cross-currents in the continent's history; (4) the acquistition of skills useful to an ongoing study of history and the social sciences; and (5) an enhanced understand, through a study of contemporary events, of the role that European nations still play in today's world. AP European History is a challenging course that is designed to be the equivalent of a freshman college course in a high school setting. It is a year-long survey of European history from the Renaissance to the present.
Credit Unit:
1
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
2 semesters 

U.S History (1877 to Present)
Description:
Following a brief review of American History to 1877, this 11th grade course traces the political, economic, social, diplomatic, and military development of the United States from Reconstruction to the present. In addition to the acquisition of knowledge, this course seeks to promote an appreciation for our American heritage, stimulate an interest in current affairs, foster a greater understanding of international relationships, and develop critical thinking and other social studies skills.
Credit Unit:
1
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
2 semesters

 AP U.S. History
Description:
AP History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and material in United States history. The course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Admission to an advanced placement history course should depend upon a student's commitent to the subject, as well as upon such formal credentials as high aptitude scores, outstanding grade records, or teacher recommendation.
Credit Unit:
1
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
2 semesters

 Economics
Description:
This course is an introduction to basic concepts of economics. Content ranges from the theoretical to the practical, and instruction takes many forms, including computer simulation and the actual creation and operation of student companies.
Credit Unit:
1/2
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
1 semester

 U.S. Government
Description:
This course focuses on the historical and philosophical development, constitutional foundations, and institutional organization and operation of the government of the United States. Its general objectives include; greater knowledge of the American system of government, increased awareness of citizens' rights and responsibilities, and the encouragement of individual participation in public affairs.
Credit Unit:
1/2
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
1 semester

 Psychology
Description:
This course provides an introduction to the history, nature, and methodology of psychology. Psychology will outline the stages of human growth and development, and investigate both normal and abnormal forms of behavior. Topics to be developed include: Psychology as a science, Human Growth and Development, Learning and Language, Personality and Deviant Behavior.
Credit Unit:
1/2
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
1 semester

Sociology
Description:
This course provides a general survey of Sociology as a social science concerned with the study of humans living together in groups. It will cover the relationships between society and culture; influence of status and roles on individuals; social stratification; influence of family, religion, education, and government on people; and the process of socialization. It will conclude with a study of the problems of mass society and social movements.
Credit Unit:
1/2
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
1 semester

Mississippi Studies (Required for graduation)
Description:
The student will understand and develop an appreciation for the geography, history, government, literature, art and music of Mississippi. Students of state and local governments examine each facet of the legislative, executive and judicial branches of our government. Special emphasis is placed on the duties and responsibilities of citizenship.
Credit Unit:
1/2
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
1 semester

 Law Related Education
Description:
This course is designed to give high school students a basic instruction to practical law used by students in everyday life. Topics to be considered include: the Crime Problem, The Role of the Police, The role of the Courts, the role of the Penal System, and Mississippi Law as it relates to young people.
Credit Unit:
1/2
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
1 Semester

 Minority Studies
Description:
Knowledge of the way people and cultures interact in Meridian and Lauderdale County. As we grapple with such questions in this course, I hope that you will emerge with: (1) an enjoyment of-or at least satisfaction from-the learning process itself; (2) a broad knowledge of the history of the different cultures of people that lived in Meridian; (3) an appreciation of some of the political, economic, social, and intellectual cross-currents in Meridian and Lauderdale history; (4) the acquistion of skills useful to an ongoing study of history and the social sciences; and (5) an enhanced understanding, through a study of contemporary events, of the role that peope still play in today's world. We will discuss the Native Americans, Jewish, Irish, Latinos, Indians & Pakistani, and African Americans in great depth.
Credit Unit:
1/2
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Class:
1 semester